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September 13 Dedication Ceremony - Joint Intake & Fish Screen Facility

Reclamation District 2035 and the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency are hosting a ceremony to dedicate a $56 million state-of-the-art surface water intake on the Sacramento River. More than 300 people are expected to attend. The ceremony is open to the public, but RSVPs are requested. RSVPs may be sent to Pamela Welling at pam@conawayranch.com. The event was highlighted in a recent letter of support from the region's Congressional Delegation. 

4 p.m., Tuesday, September 13

Joint Surface Water Intake & Fish Screen Facility Site, 18019 County Road 117, West Sacramento

Parking areas are located off site. Shuttle service will be provided from 3:15-4 p.m., and immediately following the ceremony.

Backed by historic joint construction and operation agreements between the Conaway Preservation Group and the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency, the intake facility replaces the largest unscreened surface water diversion on the Sacramento River, north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The intake will provide water for agriculture and municipal uses, while benefitting the fragile Delta ecosystem. With state-of-the-art fish screens, the facility supports the federal interest in improving protections for threatened fish populations, specifically juvenile Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, and Green Sturgeon fisheries. As such, the project successfully attracted $40.2 million in state and federal funding. The intake is also a key element of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency’s regional surface water supply project, which is designed to improve water quality and reliability for the cities of Woodland and Davis.

July 28 Dedication Planned for Cities' Largest-Ever Infrastructure Project

Sacramento River to become primary water supply for Woodland and Davis


WHAT:

California Senator Lois Wolk will join representatives of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency (WDCWA) and the cities of Woodland and Davis in dedicating the Agency’s Regional Water Treatment Facility, the long-awaited project to bring high-quality, treated Sacramento River water to the cities of Woodland and Davis and UC Davis. Facility tours will begin immediately following the event for those interested. The ceremony is open to the public, but RSVPs are requested. RSVPs may be sent to kim@floydcommunications.com.


WHEN:

10:30 a.m., Thursday, July 28

Shuttle service will be provided from 9:45-10:30 a.m., and immediately following the ceremony


WHERE:

Regional Water Treatment Facility Site, 42929 County Road 24, Woodland

County Road 24 is the extension of Gibson Street to the east. Signage will direct attendees to parking areas and available shuttle service.


WHO:

The following are expected to provide formal remarks during the ceremony:

  • CA Senator Lois Wolk
  • Yolo County Supervisor/WDCWA Founding Board Member Don Saylor
  • Davis Mayor Robb Davis
  • Woodland Mayor Jim Hilliard
  • WDCWA Founding Board Member Dr. William Marble
  • UC Davis Acting Provost Ken Burtis
  • U.S. EPA Region IX Water Division Director Tomás Torres
  • CH2M Hill Regional Manager Tom Price
  • West Yost Associates President/Lead Engineer Jim Yost

WHY:

Up until now, Woodland and Davis were two of only a very few cities in California that relied entirely on groundwater for water supplies. Faced with degrading groundwater supplies and increasingly strict state and federal regulations for drinking water and wastewater discharge, the cities formed the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency to plan, finance and construct a new surface water project to improve water quality and reliability for the majority of Yolo County residents, and also help the cities comply with current and future anticipated state and federal regulations. Formal planning for the Davis-Woodland Water Supply Project began in 2009, culminating in a $144 million Design-Build-Operate service contract for a Regional Water Treatment Facility awarded to a team led by CH2M Hill. A dedication for the water diversion (intake) facility on the Sacramento River – a joint project of WDCWA and Reclamation District 2035 – is slated for September 13.

Cities to Host Community Meetings to Discuss Introduction of Surface Water

Water Users to Learn about Water Treatment Process and What to Expect with Surface Water


WHAT:

Woodland and Davis water users are invited to learn more about changes in their water supply once the Cities of Woodland and Davis introduce surface water into water distribution systems in coming months. Construction on WDCWA’s Regional Water Treatment Facility – which will supply treated Sacramento River water to both cities and UC Davis – is nearing completion. Surface water deliveries will begin no later than early June.


WHO/WHERE:

Woodland Water Users
6 PM, Thursday, April 28

Woodland Community & Senior Center
2001 East Street, Woodland

Davis Water Users
6:30 PM, Thursday, May 5

Davis Senior Center
646 A Street, Davis


WHY:

Treated water from the Sacramento River will soon flow from taps in the Cities of Woodland and Davis, bringing a new high-quality water supply to both communities. After decades of planning and two years of construction, WDCWA’s Regional Water Treatment Facility is scheduled to begin operations no later than June 2016. Water will be transferred from a new pumping facility on the Sacramento River to the Regional Water Treatment Facility. There it will be treated using state-of the-art technology and distributed to the Cities for domestic use. The Cities have been preparing their systems for surface water, including flushing pipelines of sediment and treating them to prevent corrosion. Surface water will be slowly introduced into the systems to allow them to adapt to the new water source. Water will be frequently tested to ensure quality and that it meets or exceeds all state and federal water quality regulations. Groundwater will still be used as necessary during higher demand periods. In most cases, it will be blended with surface water before being delivered to customers.


WHO:

  • Dennis Diemer, WDCWA General Manager
  • Tim Busch, City of Woodland Community Development
  • Stan Gryczko, City of Davis Public Works

Woodland and Davis Receive Initial Installments of State Funding for Water Supply Project

YOLO COUNTY – Elation. That’s how Woodland City Manager Paul Navazio described his feelings upon receiving, hand-carrying and then depositing into the city’s bank an $18.5 million check from the State Water Resources Control Board. According to Navazio, the check is the first installment of approximately $143 million in low-interest state revolving fund loans to help fund the city’s share of the Davis-Woodland Water Supply Project (regional surface water project) and related improvements to the city’s water distribution system. The check was received by WDCWA on behalf of the city.

“The State meant ‘the check is in the mail’ quite literally,” said Navazio, pointing out that it’s rare to receive hard-copy checks for large sums in today’s age of technology. “Hand-delivering the check for deposit felt celebratory given the challenges we faced in securing such favorable financing for this project.” Navazio, the former chief finance officer for the City of Davis, has been involved with the project since its inception and was on the front end of both cities’ efforts to make the project affordable for local ratepayers.

Recently, the WDCWA, on behalf of the City of Davis, also received the first installment of a similar low-interest loan from the state’s Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan – a check for just more than $10 million – to fund Davis’ share of the project.

“These low-interest loans will cover approximately 98 percent of the regional water project costs for Woodland, Davis and UC Davis,” said Dan Wolk, Mayor of Davis and WDCWA Director. “Collectively, they will save Woodland and Davis ratepayers approximately $133.5 million over the next 20 to 30 years, when compared to conventional municipal financing. That’s great for ratepayers.”

The revolving fund programs – Safe Drinking Water (SDWSRF) and Clean Water (CWSRF) – are funded primarily by the federal government through the Environmental Protection Agency and administered by the state. The state also contributes funds to the program. The funds are considered “revolving” because local government agencies repay loans with interest to the program and the money is re-used to fund new projects in qualifying communities.

“Securing these loans was absolutely critical to the affordability of this project for our ratepayers, both present and future. It was a team effort and we could not have been successful without the efforts of many, including our board, staff members and state officials Senator Lois Wolk and former Assembly Representative Mariko Yamada. They have been steadfast advocates for the municipal, agricultural and environmental benefits of this project and we particularly acknowledge their efforts,” said Bill Marble, WDCWA Chair and Mayor Pro Tem for the City of Woodland.

“This low interest loan will reduce the costs for ratepayers and ensure that their money is spent wisely. The project will provide high quality drinking water for residents, improve the ecosystem health of the Delta where the water ultimately ends up, and advances our statewide water policy goals,” said Senator Lois Wolk in a statement last October, when the funds were authorized by the State Water Resources Control Board.

Woodland has two separate low-interest loans from the Safe Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (SDWSRF), the largest in the amount of $111.4 million to fund its share of the regional water project facilities. That funding agreement provides for a 20-year repayment period and a 1.7875 percent per year fixed interest rate. Woodland also received a separate $31.5 million SRF loan at the same interest rate to fund the capital costs of local water system improvements. Collective savings when compared to conventional financing are $75.7 million.

The State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) authorized a $95.5 Million CWSRF loan for Davis’ and UC Davis’ shares of the regional water project. With a 1.7 percent interest rate and 30- year term, the loan provides a savings of $42.1 million for the City of Davis when compared to conventional municipal financing. Additionally, the City of Davis has a separately pending application for a $35.5 million SRF loan with similar terms to fund needed improvements to the city’s existing water distribution system. When approved, this loan will save the city $15.7M when compared to conventional municipal financing.

For more information, contact Dennis Diemer, General Manager of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency at (530) 747-8299.

Davis Water Rate Payers to Save $51.5 Million in Financing Costs for Regional Water Project

YOLO COUNTY – Tens of millions in low interest financing are headed to Yolo County, thanks in large part to the efforts of local water suppliers seeking to minimize cost of service increases for their users. The Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency (WDCWA) and the City of Davis announced today that the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) authorized a $95.5 Million State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan for Davis’ and UC Davis’ shares of the regional water project. With a low 1.7 percent interest rate and 30-year term, the loan provides a savings of $36.5 million for the City of Davis when compared to conventional financing. Additionally, the City of Davis has a separately pending application for a $35 million SRF loan with similar terms to fund needed improvements to the city’s existing water distribution system. With both loans, City of Davis ratepayers will save a total of $51.5 million in financing costs over the next 30 years.

“We are very pleased the SWRCB approved the loan for Davis’ share of the regional facilities,” said Dan Wolk, Davis Mayor and WDCWA Vice-Chair. “We’ve spent the past 18 months working on the complex application and terms, but it was well worth the intensive effort. We’re making good on our promise to minimize project costs and aggressively pursue outside funding and low-interest loans to reduce the impact on rates. These actions, along with UC Davis’ recent decision to join the project and share costs, will lower Davis’ costs and the pressure for future rate increases.”

The regional surface water project, also known as the Davis-Woodland Water Supply Project, is currently under construction. Slated for completion in late 2016, the new facilities will address significant drinking water and wastewater quality problems in the communities of Woodland and Davis. Among its many benefits, it will:

  • increase reliability and diversify water supplies in both communities and for UC Davis
  • facilitate compliance with current and future wastewater discharge requirements
  • improve treated wastewater effluent quality, thereby protecting and improving the condition of the Delta
  • protect groundwater from over pumping while still meeting the region’s agricultural needs
  • reduce fish mortality in the Sacramento River as a result of a new, state-of-the-art water diversion facility that is being jointly built with RD2035, and
  • provide thousands of construction-related jobs as well as long- term permanent employment for Water Treatment Plant operators and maintenance personnel.

“The water project is an exemplary model of a true regional partnership. With our project partners, we have been able to achieve very significant economies of scale in all facets of planning, design, construction and operations, ultimately reducing the long-term cost for water users,” said Bill Marble, Woodland Mayor Pro Tem and WDCWA Chair. “The importance of this partnership to ours and future generations cannot be overstated,” he added.

“Planning for the Davis-Woodland Project began in 1994 and has been a collaborative effort between Davis, Woodland, and UC Davis over the past 20 years,” said California Senator Lois Wolk. “The loan agreement with the State Water Resources Control Board is the next step toward completion of this project. This low interest loan will reduce the costs for ratepayers and ensure that their money is spent wisely. The project will provide high quality drinking water for residents, improve the ecosystem health of the Delta where the water ultimately ends up, and advances our statewide water policy goals.”

Earlier this year, the Agency received an SRF loan from the California Department of Public Health in the amount of $111million for the City of Woodland’s share of the regional water project. Woodland also received a separate $31.5 million SRF loan for local improvements to the Woodland water distribution system. In total, SRF loans for both Woodland and Davis are projected to cover more than 98 percent of the regional water project costs. Both cities have now approved all rate increases necessary to proceed with their shares of the project. Officials from both cities emphasized the importance of developing regional partnerships and securing state and federal funding in their efforts to minimize increases to water rates.

“Water affordability is critical to the California economy, and also heavily impacts our State’s lowand fixed-income residents,” said 4th District Assemblymember Mariko Yamada. “As communities face the rising costs of food, medicines, and education, I applaud today’s Board vote in support of a long-term, regional approach to keeping water rates down.”

For more information, contact Dennis Diemer, General Manager of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency at (530) 747-8299, or Stacey Winton, City of Davis at (530) 757-5661.

Traffic Controls On Country Road 102 - July 14-August 25

Motorists should expect delays between 7 a.m. thru 4:30 p.m. due to construction-related traffic


WHAT:

Traffic delays of up to 10 minutes on County Road 102 for northbound lane #2 closure at the intersection of County Road 24 (East Gibson) and County Road 102. Construction trucks will be hauling dirt on County Road 102 between this location and the “Cannery Project” in Davis (1000 East Covell Boulevard). Approximately 20 trucks are expected to be traveling round trip on this route at any given time.


WHEN:

7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, beginning Monday, July 14

Traffic controls are expected to be in place six weeks, or about August 25. Motorists are asked to be on the lookout for construction traffic. Traffic signage will be posted on County Road 102. Motorists are asked to use detours and/or allow extra time to reach their destinations.


WHY:

Construction on WDCWA’s Regional Water Treatment Facility is progressing on schedule. Construction trucks will be hauling excess dirt from excavations to the “Cannery Project.”


CONTACT:

Questions and concerns can be addressed by calling the project hotline at (530) 402-7702. To view monthly construction updates and find more information, visit www.wdcwa.com.


Contract OK’d for the Design, Construction and Operation of Water Supply Project

WOODLAND, CA – It was what can only be considered a banner moment. By unanimous vote, the Board of the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency today awarded a $141.2 million service contract to CH2M Hill for the design, construction and long-term operation of a new surface water treatment system. The service contract, which will cost 25 percent less than the Agency’s original estimate, will provide for the delivery of surface water to Woodland and Davis by 2016. The project is necessary to improve water supply reliability and water quality, and help the cities comply with increasingly strict state and federal water quality and wastewater discharge regulations. Project development started in 2007, but is really the culmination of two decades of planning by agencies responsible for providing water to more than two-thirds of Yolo County residents.

“This vote represents a significant milestone in a chain of significant milestones over the past few years,” said Bill Marble, Board Vice-Chair and Woodland City Councilman. “It started with two cities working together to secure a water right in an effort some said would never happen, and certainly couldn’t happen in today’s environment. Along the way we purchased an additional water right. We engaged in a historic urban-ag partnership with Reclamation District 2035 on a joint water intake facility. We’ve achieved a savings of more than 25 percent from original project cost estimates. We’ve come a very long way. We should be proud and celebrate the signing of this contract.”

Joe Krovoza, Board Chair and Davis Mayor added, “I’m very proud to have been able to work on this, and I offer a special thanks to Board Vice-Chair Bill Marble who has been the constant on this Board and behind this effort. As he noted, this is one significant decision in a string of 10 or 15 monumental actions by both communities. The water advisory committee in Davis is to be thanked for its role in reducing the scope and cost of the project. On behalf of the City of Davis, I would like to thank the City of Woodland for its partnership.”

“It’s the leadership of bringing the communities together and working with a private partner, Reclamation District 2035, that makes this very significant,” said Board Member and Woodland Mayor Skip Davies. “Everyone has been working together for the interests of our collective citizens. We’ve overcome major obstacles and proven that as different as we are, the cities work well together. We’re improving both the water quality and the economic stability of our communities. It’s especially important for those here, but even more so for those who will follow. I would also like to thank our state and federal elected officials and partners whose support has been very critical to our ability to approve this contract today.”

Board Member and Yolo County Supervisor Don Saylor, who along with Bill Marble is a founding member of the WDCWA, stated, “This is one of the most significant milestones in Yolo County history. I started working on this my first year on the Davis City Council in 2003, and at that time we began setting the stage for the good work this Agency has pulled together. The pursuit of a Design-Build-Operate contract has proven to be the right choice. The cost reductions, protections for the cities and quality assurances combine into what is truly a good piece of work. This is a historic moment and also an amazing legacy.”

The Agency began the competitive procurement process in January 2011 by issuing a request for qualifications from contractor teams with proven experience in the design, construction and operation of water treatment facilities. In June 2011, the Agency pre-qualified three contractor teams. By June 2013, two of the three teams had bowed out because they were unable to deliver the project under the rigorous terms and cost limits established by the Agency. CH2M Hill was able to submit a responsive cost and technical proposal that led to service contract negotiations, and today’s contract award.

The Agency plans to hold a “Meet the Contractor” community meeting in early December. The service contract and CH2M Hill’s price proposal are available on the Agency’s website. Click here for key details on the service contract, or contact WDCWA General Manager Dennis Diemer at (530) 747-8299.

Agency to Consider Approval of Contract for Water Facility Construction

WOODLAND, CA – Following a nearly three-year competitive process for the selection of a contractor to design, build and operate a new surface water treatment system for the cities of Woodland and Davis, the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency (WDCWA) Board of Directors is to consider awarding a $141.2 million service contract to CH2M Hill, the sole bidder able to meet the Agency’s requirements for project costs, quality assurances and performance guarantees. CH2M Hill’s price proposal is approximately 25 percent lower than the Agency’s original cost estimate. The contract will come before the Board at its regular meeting at 3 p.m. on October 10 at the City of Davis, City Hall. If approved, construction of the facility is expected to begin in March 2014.

“We set the bar high for our expectations for quality and maximum cost,” said WDCWA General Manager Dennis Diemer. “During the past three years, we systematically reduced the project cost estimate and set a maximum project cost for the regional facilities to be constructed by the Design- Build-Operate team at $151.5 million. CH2M Hill’s fixed price proposal came in $10.3 million under the maximum project cost requirement. We are very pleased that CH2M Hill was able to provide a proposal significantly below our maximum cost limit and in compliance with all of the Agency’s requirements for the operation and maintenance of the facility at a substantial savings. CH2M Hill has a proven track record for delivering high quality water facilities. We’re confident in their ability to deliver the Agency’s project on time and within budget.”

The Agency began the competitive bidding process in January 2011 when it issued a request for qualifications from a contractor teams capable of designing, building and operating the water treatment facility at a set price for a period no less than 15 years. In June 2011, the Agency approved three highly-qualified contractor teams for participation in its competitive bidding process. By June 2013, two of the three contractor teams had dropped out because they were unable to deliver the project under the rigorous terms and cost limits established by the Agency.

CH2M Hill submitted a proposal for the project in July 2013. Following an exhaustive review by the Agency, that proposal was deemed compliant with the Agency’s requirements for use of the latest construction technology and operating procedures. These requirements will best ensure full compliance with present and anticipated state and federal drinking water regulations. The Agency Board subsequently authorized the negotiation of a service contract with CH2M Hill. Key components of the proposed service contract include:

  1. Transfer of substantial construction, maintenance and repair risks to CH2M Hill. CH2M Hill will be responsible for: obtaining and maintaining numerous permits, licenses and other regulatory approvals; any additional design costs that exceed the fixed price proposal; increased costs associated with failure to complete design and construction on schedule; certain risks associated with differing site conditions; consistently producing treated water that complies with all federal and state drinking water regulations; costs associated with equipment breakdown and failure; and repairing and replacing facilities as may be required throughout the operations phase at a cost not to exceed the established service fee. In the event that any of these risks occur, CH2M HILL will be required to expend its own capital to address the risk and resolve problems.
  2. Unconditional guarantees to the Agency for the full and timely performance of the design, construction and operation obligations.
  3. Plans for the competitive subcontracting of approximately 70 percent of construction work, which includes materials and the construction of the pipelines and water treatment facility.
  4. Provisions for the “open book” review of costs for the roughly 30 percent of the work CH2M Hill will perform directly, such as project design.
  5. A program for the major maintenance, repairs and replacement of Project machinery, equipment, structures and improvements, and a method for funding that work as part of the annual service fee to be paid during the 15 to 20 year operations period.
  6. Partial design and construction financing in an amount equal to 10 percent of the designbuild price (approximately $14 million). Under these terms, the Agency will finance 90 percent of the design-build price and CH2M HILL will finance 10 percent on an ongoing basis until completion of construction. The Agency is obligated to repay the financing only after the satisfactory completion of design and construction.

Information on the service contract is available as part of the October 10 Board agenda packet, which can be accessed via the Agency’s website. The entire service contract is available on the Documents page of the Agency’s website. For more information, please contact WDCWA General Manager Dennis Diemer at (530) 747-8299.

State Budget Includes $10 Million for Woodland-Davis Water Project

DAVIS, CA – The Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency and Reclamation District 2035 announced today their success in securing $10 million in Proposition 40 funds for a new surface water intake facility on the Sacramento River. The funding, which was included as part of the state budget signed yesterday by Governor Brown, will complement $16.7 million previously committed by the US Bureau of Reclamation for the project.

“We were successful at the state level thanks in large part to assistance from California Secretary of Natural Resources John Laird and backing from State Legislators Lois Wolk and Mariko Yamada,” said WDCWA Chair and Woodland City Councilman Bill Marble. “We also had strong support from local and regional officials and other organizations interested in protecting the health of the Delta and associated waterways. This was a great team effort.”

“This project improves drinking water quality for the residents of Yolo County, while also improving water quality in the Sacramento River and in the imperiled Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta,” said State Senator Lois Wolk. “This is a rare opportunity to move forward a project that truly benefits both the water supply of this region and the ecosystem of the Delta, and I am happy to support efforts to secure both state and federal funding.”

“This joint intake reduces the environmental impacts of separate diversion facilities,” said Assemblymember Mariko Yamada. “The broad regional, state and federal support for this project’s potential to restore historical ecological conditions is a win for the environment and the economy.”

The intake, which is to be jointly constructed by the Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency (WDCWA) and Reclamation District 2035 (RD 2035), is a cornerstone of the Agency’s regional surface water project to serve Woodland and Davis, but will also provide irrigation water to sustain agricultural operations in the area. It will replace the largest unscreened intake on the Sacramento River north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, featuring fish screens to prevent the entrapment of juvenile salmon and other threatened and endangered fish species. For that reason, the project has earned broad support from federal officials and agencies interested in improving ecosystem conditions in the Delta and connected waterways.

“With federal and state funding in place for the intake facility, we are in a position to initiate bidding for this part of the project in the fall, and start construction in February,” said current WDCWA Board Vice-Chair and Davis Mayor Joe Krovoza. "Securing funds for the intake demonstrates the success we are having in obtaining outside funding to lower project costs to ratepayers. This success encourages us to work still harder to offset other project costs, such as those for the water treatment facility and pipelines. Importantly, WDCWA and both cities remain strongly focused on all means that might assist us in driving down project costs."

The strong commitment to cost reductions was underscored by WDCWA Board Member and Woodland City Mayor Skip Davies. “The cities, independently of the WDCWA, will also pursue both federal and state assistance in the form of grants and low-interest loans to minimize the financial impact on our water customers,” said Davies. “We promised our ratepayers to do all we can to ‘buy down’ the need for rate increases with state and federal funding. The state funding is one example of how we are honoring that promise.” 

For more information, please contact WDCWA General Manager Dennis Diemer at (530) 747-8299.

Agency Takes Action to Further Reduce Water Supply Project Cost

DAVIS, CA – The Woodland-Davis Clean Water Agency (Agency) took several important actions to further reduce surface water project costs, living up to its commitment to soften the associated rate impacts to water utility consumers in Woodland and Davis.

Earlier today, the Agency’s Board adopted an amendment to its request for proposals for a Design-Build-Operate (DBO) contractor. The DBO process, already determined to be the least-costly means to implement the project, will result in a single contractor that will design and build the water treatment plant and pipelines, and then operate the facility for a fixed price for a specified number of years, currently set at 15.

Generally speaking, the amendment modifies some of the terms and technical aspects of the proposal request document. Most significantly, it includes: 1) a 10 percent reduction in the maximum project cost; 2) a requirement that competitive bidding be used for the selection of construction subcontractors and equipment, which is expected to account for 70 percent of all work; and 3) a requirement that the contractor allow for “open book” reviews by the Agency of profit and overhead margins for the 30 percent of the work the contractor will perform directly.

“With this amendment, we’ve set a very aggressive maximum price by driving down the cost of these project elements to $151.5 million. That’s a 20 percent decrease from original engineering estimates,” said Bill Marble, Chair of the Agency and a member of the Woodland City Council. “This will directly translate into costs savings and lessen pressure on rates over the long run.”

Under the amended request for proposals, proposers will be deemed responsive if they can, among other things: demonstrate an ability to meet or beat the Agency’s maximum project cost; outline a plan for the competitive subcontracting of approximately 70 percent of construction work, which is expected to include materials and the construction of the pipelines and water treatment facility; and specify a process for an “open book” review of costs for the roughly 30 percent of the work they will perform directly, such as project design.

“Today’s actions continued the Agency’s work to fiercely protect ratepayers’ financial interests by lowering project costs,” said Joe Krovoza, Vice-Chair of the Agency and Mayor of Davis. “In addition, we’ll satisfy our requirements for absolute transparency and better ensure the contractor’s pricing is competitive and comparable to industry norms.”

According to the Agency’s General Manager Dennis Diemer, the total costs for the water treatment facility, pipelines and the Agency’s share of the intake facility is now $234.75 million in 2013 dollars, which is down from the 2012 estimate of $245 million. On other fronts, the Agency continues to pursue state and federal assistance in the form of grants and low-interest loans, again with a goal of reducing the costs for water utility ratepayers. Word on the status of an application for the State Revolving Fund program, which provides very low-interest loans to municipal agencies, is expected within the next few weeks.

For more information, please contact WDCWA General Manager Dennis Diemer at (530) 747-8299.